NY Desk /

Nanni Balestrini – Tristanoil / Flash Art NY Desk

21, 22, 23.05.15

Opening: 21.05.15, 6:30 pm

Tristanoil (2012) is a movie by Nanni Balestrini (b. 1935, Milan; lives in Rome and Paris) generated by a software program that continuously reassembles approximately 150 clips. The movie can be described as an open, self-perpetuating structure in which a sole scenario recurs: the destruction of the planet through the predatory use of its resources.

Here Balestrini continues his inquiry into strategies of creative production that sidestep subjectively produced matter and the utter subtraction of self-expression. Indeed, Tristanoil was first developed in another form — the experimental novel Tristano, in which the artist assembled heterogeneous materials according to a combinatory system. First released in 1966, the novel is a cut-up of literary fragments sourced from crime novels, technical manuals, school textbooks, feuilletons and so on, which were mounted together by an early calculator. Hence, both the novel and the movie exploit combinatory principles, mathematics and programming over the subjectivity of the author.

Tristanoil fuses together three main sources of visual documents: the infamous TV series Dallas, ecological disasters (oil spills, air pollution, landslides and the overall defacement of the natural landscape due to uncontrolled industrial activities) and scenes from the financial world (above all from the 2008 Wall Street crash). Oil trembles over these images, as on the surface of the ocean, transfiguring the archival materials into a psychedelic narration of the detrimental effects of oil consumption.

Nanni Balestrini’s art has been exhibited at the 45th Venice Biennale and dOCUMENTA (13). Solo shows have been hosted by MACRO, Rome; Fondazione Morra, Naples; and Museion, Bolzano, among others.

Tristanoil is presented in conjunction with the release of the May-June issue of Flash Art International. In this issue: Martine Syms talked with Los Angeles-based artist Charles Gaines; Orit Gat met with Genius’s Tom Lehman, Christopher Glazek and Emily Segal to discuss where their website is going; Boško Blagojevic introduces New York–based artist Bradley Kronz; Mitchell Anderson reviews the art of Switzerland’s 56th Venice Biennale representative Pamela Rosenkranz; Cyril Duval considers the ongoing relevance of Tobias Wong, “the enfant terrible of the design world”; Michele D’Aurizio, Gea Politi and Lodovico Pignatti Morano met with three figures whose creative outputs are intimately tied to the city of Milan: Ugo La Pietra, Giorgio Armani, and Nanni Balestrini; Robin Peckham spotlights Chinese artist Tianzhuo Chen; and Sylvain Amic discusses the work of Italian artist Claudio Parmiggiani.

Flash Art NY Desk / Film Center
630 9th Ave (Btw 44th and 45th St.)
Suite 403
New York, NY 10036
T : (646) 682-7268
Thu – Sat, noon – 6 pm

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NY Desk /

Hudinilson Jr., Hudinilson Jr. / Flash Art NY Desk

The art of Hudinilson Urbano Junior (São Paulo, 1957 – 2013) emerged in the late 1970s, when Brazilian cultural production was stifled by the military dictatorship, and the avant-garde Concretist project of blending art and life had been appropriated by the bohemia.

In a context in which the very few extant museums and galleries were presided over by the establishment, and the only interventions in public space had to assume the posture of a guerrilla action (Hudinilson Jr was originally part of the collective 3NÓS3 who, among their many performances, bagged monuments around the city), the artist turned to the intimate domain of his own body: by using a Xerox machine he accessed, reproduced and learned about every single detail of his anatomy. “Already from the beginning, the topic of my work was the body,” says Hudinilson Jr in one of his last interviews. “If a person is alone with a Xerox machine, what is the first thing this person will do? […] I first Xeroxed the hand, then the face — but then also all the rest. […] I would close the door, undress and continue my explorations.”

The exhibition at the Flash Art NY Desk brought together a constellation of works, mostly from the 1980s, which all insist on Hudinilson Jr’s obsession with the male body. Collages, photographs, found objects and sculptures, along with the trademark Xeroxes, allow for a scrutiny of the traits of virility, from clichéd representations of gay pornography to abstractions that result from the feverish process of enlarging, reframing and collaging together pictures of the artist’s own body. The narcissistic afflatus, which Hudinilson Jr always intuitively recognized as the thrust of his practice, can also be recognized as an empirical exploration of his queer identity — an impending onanism that exhausts the political gesture by imitating a sexual encounter that can only be nonproductive: hence, the artist’s posição amorosa, his “sex position,” fosters little more than the “exercise” of reproducing the self.

Organized by Michele D’Aurizio.

The exhibition is generously supported by Galeria Jaqueline Martins, São Paulo.

Flash Art NY Desk / Film Center
630 9th Ave (Btw 44th and 45th St.)
Suite 403
New York, NY 10036
T : (646) 682-7268
Thu – Sat, noon – 6 pm

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NY Desk /

Hudinilson Jr, Hudinilson Jr / Flash Art NY Desk

Opening: 06.03.15, 6:30 pm
07.03 – 04.04.15

The art of Hudinilson Urbano Junior (São Paulo, 1957 – 2013) emerged in the late 1970s, when Brazilian cultural production was stifled by the military dictatorship, and the avant-garde Concretist project of blending art and life had been appropriated by the bohemia. In a context in which the very few extant museums and galleries were presided over by the establishment, and the only interventions in public space had to assume the posture of a guerrilla action (Hudinilson Jr was originally part of the collective 3NÓS3 who, among their many performances, bagged monuments around the city), the artist turned to the intimate domain of his own body: by using a Xerox machine he accessed, reproduced and learned about every single detail of his anatomy. “Already from the beginning, the topic of my work was the body,” says Hudinilson Jr in one of his last interviews. “If a person is alone with a Xerox machine, what is the first thing this person will do? […] I first Xeroxed the hand, then the face — but then also all the rest. […] I would close the door, undress and continue my explorations.”

The exhibition at the Flash Art NY Desk brings together a constellation of works, mostly from the 1980s, which all insist on Hudinilson Jr’s obsession with the male body. Collages, photographs, found objects and sculptures, along with the trademark Xeroxes, allow for a scrutiny of the traits of virility, from clichéd representations of gay pornography to abstractions that result from the feverish process of enlarging, reframing and collaging together pictures of the artist’s own body. The narcissistic afflatus, which Hudinilson Jr always intuitively recognized as the thrust of his practice, can also be recognized as an empirical exploration of his queer identity — an impending onanism that exhausts the political gesture by imitating a sexual encounter that can only be nonproductive: hence, the artist’s posição amorosa, his “sex position,” fosters little more than the “exercise” of reproducing the self.

Organized by Michele D’Aurizio

The exhibition is generously supported by Galeria Jaqueline Martins, São Paulo.

Flash Art NY Desk / Film Center
630 9th Ave (Btw 44th and 45th St.) 
Suite 403
New York, NY 10036
T : (646) 682-7268
Thu – Sat, noon – 6 pm

read more
NY Desk /

Khar Pidda – A Tribute / Flash Art NY Desk

Lupo Borgonovo, Elaine Cameron-Weir and Ben Schumacher, Sam Falls, Lucy Kim, Dave Miko, Ruairiadh O’Connell, Matt Paweski, Kour Pour, Adele Röder

Opening reception: March 4th, 2014, 6 – 9 pm
March 5th – April 5th, 2014

The exhibition is conceived as a tribute to Frank Stella’s late 1970s series of paintings “Indian Birds,” and in particular to Khar Pidda (1978), published on the cover of Flash Art International 92-93 in 1979. Compared to Stella’s previous series, the “Indian Birds” display a more complex, grand and baroque, composition, where the containing background is suppressed in favor of a merely structural metal grid. Large irregular panels overlap in a layered entanglement of curves—making the visual assimilation of the paintings as an “endeavor,” an attempt to solve the dialectics between the many parts constituting the ensem- ble, and leveling the mobility of the pictorial space.

The exhibition will bring together contemporary artworks which could be visually related to “fragments” of the “Indian Birds”, in order to inquire Stella’s shifting compositional process, visual references and sculptural approach to painting. Echoing the approach of the French group Supports/Surfaces, the exhibition display will play with the deconstruction, dismantling and subverting of Khar Pidda.

Special thanks to: Bortolami, Alessio Cancello, Lisa Cooley, Michele D’Aurizio, Marcus Geiger, Hannah Hoffmann, Hotel Americano, Gea Politi, Project Native Informant, Overduin & Co., Maciej Tajber, and Andre Sakhai.

Flash Art NY Desk
Film Center
630 9th Ave (btw. 44th and 45th Street) Suite 403
New York, NY 10036

T (646) 682-7268 F (646) 682-7196

Opening hours: Wednesday to Saturday, noon to 6pm